Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from vintage-freakshow  20 notes
vintage-freakshow:

Stone Man Syndrome or FOP (Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva) is an extremely rare disease of the connective tissue. It’s a mutation of our body’s repair mechanism causes fibrous tissue (muscles, tendons, ligaments) to become ossified when damaged. In many cases injuries can cause joints to become frozen in place. Surgery can be performed to remove bone growths but the bone will grow back in place.

vintage-freakshow:

Stone Man Syndrome or FOP (Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva) is an extremely rare disease of the connective tissue. It’s a mutation of our body’s repair mechanism causes fibrous tissue (muscles, tendons, ligaments) to become ossified when damaged. In many cases injuries can cause joints to become frozen in place. Surgery can be performed to remove bone growths but the bone will grow back in place.

Did the most amazing Taxidermy class yesterday. For those of you who think it’s weird and gross.
The mice are clean and euthanized in a humane way.
Little Axel here would have been snake food, but instead given a new form of life.
In the process you really connect with the animal, getting to know them inside and out. Making sure you respect them and handle with care.
I love the end result and my new little buddie.

Reblogged from ritualtitfuck  1,627 notes

oldfilmsflicker:

toomuchhorrorfiction:

Artist Michael Whelan born today, June 29, in 1950

His illustration for the 1982/3 H.P. Lovecraft reprints from Ballantine/Del Rey has become nearly as iconic as the stories themselves.

a family friend gave me a copy of one of these books when I was like 12 and it scared me so much I threw it under my bed and didn’t see it again until I was packing up to go to college…

Reblogged from ritualtitfuck  1,295 notes
sixpenceee:

UNETHICAL EXPERIMENTS: SHOCKS FOR PICTURES
In 1862, French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne wanted to test the popular theory (at the time) that the face was directly linked to the soul.
He had already done some work applying electric shocks to patients’ damaged muscles and he reasoned that if he could apply electric currents to a subject’s face he could stimulate the muscles and photograph the results.
One problem was that while it was easy to activate responses with electric shocks, it passed too quickly for the camera to record. 
One of the patients at the hospital where Duchenne worked was a shoemaker who suffered from facial paralysis, which meant he would hold facial expressions longer- long enough to photograph. 
The above picture is one of the pictures. 
Duchenne subjected the shoemaker to over 100 sessions. While it was clearly unethical and pretty painful, Duchenne figured out the muscles required for a genuine smile.  
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

UNETHICAL EXPERIMENTS: SHOCKS FOR PICTURES

In 1862, French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne wanted to test the popular theory (at the time) that the face was directly linked to the soul.

He had already done some work applying electric shocks to patients’ damaged muscles and he reasoned that if he could apply electric currents to a subject’s face he could stimulate the muscles and photograph the results.

One problem was that while it was easy to activate responses with electric shocks, it passed too quickly for the camera to record.

One of the patients at the hospital where Duchenne worked was a shoemaker who suffered from facial paralysis, which meant he would hold facial expressions longer- long enough to photograph.

The above picture is one of the pictures.

Duchenne subjected the shoemaker to over 100 sessions. While it was clearly unethical and pretty painful, Duchenne figured out the muscles required for a genuine smile.  

SOURCE